eweekchat

Predixions/Wild Guesses 2021
JOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about what we predict in terms of IT trends, new products and services in 2021.
   a year ago
#eweekchatNew Tech to Expect in 2021JOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about innovation and what we might expect in terms of new products and services in 2021.
   9 months ago
#eweekchatNext-Gen Security TrendsJOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about what SecOps and DataOps admins are looking at to fortify their systems following the huge Solarwinds and FireEye data breaches.
Chris Preimesberger
Q1: What one or two important trends do you see coming in 2021 that we must pay attention to?
Ken Englund
A1: continued acceleration analytic/data workloads to the cloud @editingwhiz
Chris Preimesberger
Thanks for joining us, Ken!
Rotem
A1 - work from home means physical networks don’t make much sense any more, and remote access is becoming an even greater security challenge. SASE cloud based networks make more sense in the world ahead and I predict we’re going to see more of it
Matias Madou
A1: We will come to the realisation that code is written by humans aka developers, and not robots. Gosh, we have to help the human, the developer in writing secure code to protect us
Chris Preimesberger
Thanks for joining us, Rotem!
Bruce Kornfeld
A1 - The biggest trends thats taking shape is edge computing. Its been talked about a lot over the last few years, but real deployments for production will accelerate in 2021 - COVID has assisted in this trend.
Alex Sakaguchi
A1: Funny thing. 2020 is the year everyone wished they could reset. In order to reset, you need a backup. Expect 2021 to be even crazier. Going out on a limb here...have a good backup strategy! [only semi-joking]
Chris Preimesberger
Thanks for joining us, Matias and Bruce! Bruce you're a veteran of this event!
Bruce Kornfeld
@ASakaguchi good one! everyone needs backup but are afraid to talk about it!
Alex Sakaguchi
A1: seriously though, rise in both value and criticality of data (personal data, machine data, etc.), more automation, more orchestration, etc. That also means more attacks on that data to cause chaos and anarchy. We're seeing it everywhere today already.
Rob Woollen
A1: 2020 showed we all need to be in the cloud. I expect 2021 to show the power of applications architected for a cloud-first world.
Bruce Kornfeld
Thanks Chris. These #eweekchats are fun and hopefully informative for many.
Chris Preimesberger
Thanks, Rob, for joining us today!
Bruce Kornfeld
@ASakaguchi Don't forget that backups are just a piece of the puzzle. Encryption is needed as well to make sure data isn't compromised somewhere along the way - even encrypted backups would make a lot of sense.
Alex Sakaguchi
@brucekornfeld No one wants to talk about. They just need it to always be there working in the background. When you know what hits the fan, organizations live or die on their ability to restore. Weird to say, but true.
Alex Sakaguchi
@brucekornfeld Agreed. They're just a piece. Encryption, immutability, etc. All additional pieces. Unfortunately, often forgotten...
Alex Sakaguchi
@mmadou Interesting thought. I would guess the other way around. Today, code is written by humans. Tomorrow, it'll be written by machines?
Colin Truran
@brucekornfeld totally agree. but backups need to include encryption end to end rather than being a bolt on right?
Alex Sakaguchi
@rwoollen I agree with this. But I also suspect most enterprise organizations are already thinking this. How, is definitely not yet solved. More than 70% of F500 orgs still invest heavily in mainframe. But the thinking is already cloud first.
Dave Padmos
@ASakaguchi More devices add to the challenge, risk needs to be addressed for certain
Alex Sakaguchi
@brucekornfeld I believe what you're saying about edge and edge computing. WRT covid, I think edge computing is going to lead the way in both identifying and solving future potential global pandemics.
Alex Sakaguchi
@dave_padmos So true. But not just devices. Data sources, applications, architectural differences, generations of technology, edge, core, cloud, etc. The landscape is so diverse. No tech gen has replaced the previous gen...they co-exist. Massive complexity.
Dave Padmos
yes indeed, and with technology costs coming down and flexibility increasing with cloud, there is big incentive to forgo large ERP transformations and address specific needs more quickly to reduce the cluster (confusion)
Bruce Kornfeld
@ASakaguchi Good point. As we all learned, pandemics quickly go around the world - not to be solved by sitting in a corporate datacenter - I agree that innovation at the edge will help prevent (or at least react faster to) the next pandemic.

(edited)

Matias Madou
@ASakaguchi Well until robots can write the code, we still need to deal with developers. Developers are quite often forgotten, and we have to help them. Their code is day-in-day-out controlled by scanners and monitors, and all sorts of tech.
Alex Sakaguchi
@mmadou I think the developers get elevated to be honest. It won't be about writing code. It will be about defining how code should be written. Then letting the machine execute instructions so to speak. Power of AI I guess?
Matias Madou
@ASakaguchi Absolutely, that is a real thing. Helping the developer in writing code, quality code/secure code, with real time help when he is coding.

(edited)

Chris Preimesberger
Ack,a typo: Q4: What new devices, software and services might we expect to see -- or, what you would LIKE to see -- in 2021?
Alex Sakaguchi
A4: I think folks need a way to gain a new perspective in 2021. Chartering commercial voyages to the edge of the atmosphere on a rocket to view the world from a different vantage is one I think would help with healing.
Suhail Ansari
I would love to see products and services that help consumers get more control over their data and online identity
Chris Preimesberger
@ASakaguchi Now THAT'S a good way to get an entirely new perspective on everything!
Bruce Kornfeld
A4: The time has come to ditch those expensive hypervisors, they just aren't needed anymore. They served a great purpose for more than 20 years, but times are changing. Users can now confidently deploy applications on Linux KVM hypervisor or containers.
Alex Sakaguchi
Seriously though, since this is a technical convo, I think the very literal consumerization of IT will be realized in 2021 more fully. The way we interact with our phones is the way we want to interact with IT systems. Unification, simplicity, abstraction...

(edited)

Alex Sakaguchi
infrastructure and systems will be commoditized so that the only emphasis is on the data. Policy will follow data, not exist on clouds or infrastructure. Complete untethering of the data is what I'd like to see.
Dave Padmos
@ASakaguchi Exactly correct, I often wonder how successful the iPhone would have been without apps, certainly not nearly as popular without social media apps...point is the phone is not the "thing" really it's how and how much we NEED to interact
Colin Truran
Microsoft have created the data substrate which is detaching data from the services and applications which it was created in. this will provide a major advantage to organisations wishing to utilize and manage their data better
Alex Sakaguchi
@dave_padmos Agreed. It's the ecosystem for sure. But all that complexity and interworking goodness in the device is abstracted leaving us only the experience--with the ability to customize it. That's what awaits IT.
Rotem
A2 - need to focus on manage, not eliminate, and yes. we can get a handle on it. Most attacks are predictable and the security issues are mundane. But we have to recognize we've put SMB in an impossible situation
Rotem
i don't think it will happen fast enough, but we need to get businesses off of email
Chris Preimesberger
I don't often hear the term "mundane" connected with data security and PII privacy, especially if we're talking about YOUR data!
Rotem
SMB attackers are opportunistic. They go to where it is easiest. Most times, they take advantage of mundane, day to day opsec issues like patching, exposed ports. Not sexy, but this is where most of our claims are
Rotem
opsec doesn't get a lot of attention because it has to do with talent resources and training, some technology (on a low budget). But its the slient killer of SMBs
Dave Padmos
Mundane = Lack of Focus, never ceases to amaze me that companies "wake up" every year or two as a "hack" appears in the news...then mundane let's them relax which is ironic
Bruce Kornfeld
@editingwhiz This stuff is HARD. I have no idea how end users sort through all of this techno-mumbo jumbo and figure out how to protect their data. NOT mundane..just the opposite.
Bruce Kornfeld
@SandyAdam Just disconnect your corporate network from the internet - you'll be safe!!!!

(edited)

Ken Englund
continued to be focused on just increasing the level of automation and predictive analytics in play to keep improving the effort @RotemIram
Rotem
Us security guys are passionate about this, but a business manager doesn't care. I call these mundane because operations is hard, and there is no magic solution, and its not exciting to talk about. And managed security in SMB is, well... not great
Sandy Adam #WearaMask
the more emails I get saying my data has been breached, the more I appreciate you security guys!
Alex Sakaguchi
interesting to consider SMB. it's a matter of resources. probably a bigger political/economic situation here. But how can you advance 'management' capabilities, if you are struggling to survive. Dare I ask, are restrictions responsible for data compromise?
Rotem
i am biased, but i see SMB security converging around cyber insurance. As the insurance company, I have a vested interest, resources and scale to help SMBs stay safe.