eweekchat

No- & Low-Code Development
JOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about how do-it-yourself IT development is becoming a staple in creating and fine-tuning new-gen enterprise applications.
   6 months ago
#eweekchatPromise, Potential of the EdgeJOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about how IT is rapidly evolving into a new phase that may turn out to be as important as, if not more important than, the cloud itself.
   4 months ago
#eweekchatPredictions/Wild Guesses 2020JOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about what you think we can expect to see--or maybe shouldn't see--in IT next year.
Jason Bloomberg
Q4: Functionality that is still a work in progress for #lowcode vendors: #AI. Many have some basic machine learning, but there is far more that these platforms could offer.
Chris Preimesberger
Can you name 1 or 2 examples of what you'd like to see?
Chris Preimesberger
Would AI assists be helpful in no-low-code? How so?
Mike Hughes
A4 assisted development is definitely an opportunity - many of the vendors have early solutions but there is much more potential
Praveen Seshadri
A4: yes, two different dimensions to the use of AI --- (a) making the apps intelligent, and (b) making the platform intelligent
Mike Hughes
A4 a few examples - suggesting next best action for models - suggesting data models based on common industry patterns - examining running apps and anticipating problems... AI use cases are many
JourneyApps
@editingwhiz A4 Long-term I'd like to see a voice-based AI that I can describe my business process to and that builds the app for me.
Praveen Seshadri
@JourneyApps take a look at "Start with an Idea" in AppSheet
Appdome
AI is very important as the system learns it makes the experience better for the user.
Chris Preimesberger
Q3: What kinds of QA issues can come up in No- and low-code development? Is it difficult to manage?
JourneyApps
Q3/A3 End-to-end testing such as automated testing of UI remains a big challenge.
Praveen Seshadri
A3: this is a very interesting question. At AppSheet, we find that QA is very much easier with no-code. Because it is the same code running across 10,000 apps. Rather than different code in each of them
Mike Hughes
A3 - i think similar concepts apply - you create units test but you write them in a visual language (so simpler and easier to understand) - at the end of the day, testing is an important part of development regardless of approach
Praveen Seshadri
Agree with @mnjhughes .One interesting thing we find with no-code apps is that it is possible to auto-capture and auto-play tests. It does automate some of the traditional "test development"
Praveen Seshadri
I suspect the same is possible with low-code as well.
Mike Hughes
@journeyapps A3 on the plus side, often the same testing tools and resources can be applied to the output of the no- low-code platform
Mike Hughes
A3 no- and low-code platforms also offer many guardrails that reduce some of the testing burden - this is an interesting area for AI-assisted dev where prior coding patterns help identify potential issues from developers
Chris Preimesberger
Q2: Are mobile apps most likely to be developed using No- and low-code dev? Why or why not?
JourneyApps
A2 I think it really depends on the scope of the project. For simple and med complexity apps I think yes, all mobile apps will eventually be built under this paradigm. For more complex use cases though, this becomes more challenging.
Chris Preimesberger
A2: I was thinking it's largely because there are so many mobile devices and services needed that demand alone for this is a major reasons.
Praveen Seshadri
A2: mobile apps are particularly difficult to write with traditional code. Differences between iOS and Android, device form factors, offline, etc. So both no-code and low-code are attractive approaches for mobile apps
Chris Preimesberger
Hello, all, and to all ships at sea!
Welcome to #eWEEKchat No. 80, "No- and Low-Code Development."
Chris Preimesberger
I'm eWEEK editor Chris Preimesberger, moderating on a blue-sky all morning from Silicon Valley, Calif. Thank you for joining us.
Chris Preimesberger
We're doing a 45-minute chat interview with our experts: Jason Bloomberg, President, Intellyx; Mike Hughes, Chief Evangelist, Outsystems; Praveen Seshadri, founder of AppSheet; Kobie Botha, Chief Product Officer, JourneyApps.
Praveen Seshadri
Hi Chris, good to be here
Chris Preimesberger
Each of these invited professionals is expert in today's topic. eWEEK thanks them for offering their availability today.
Chris Preimesberger
I will ask some seed questions, and our guests can answer as they see fit. Others following the conversation also may participate.
Let's stay on topic at all times.
Chris Preimesberger
To follow our discussion in real time, go here (http://www.crowdchat.net/eweekchat) ... You do have to authorize Twitter to join.
http://www.crowdchat.net/eweekchat
[LIVE CHAT] Promise, Potential of the Edge
[LIVE CHAT] Promise, Potential of the Edge
JOIN US: This is a chat-based conversation about how IT is rapidly evolving into a new phase that may turn out to be as important as, if not more important than, the cloud itself.
Chris Preimesberger
Sound good? Let's get to it ...
Chris Preimesberger
Oh, please preface your answers to questions by noting Q1/A1, Q2/A2, etc.
Chris Preimesberger
All of these are tossup questions for our guest experts: Answer when ready to do so.
Chris Preimesberger
Q1: At a high level, how do you define no- and low-code development?
Praveen Seshadri
A1: pretty simple really. No-code means "NO" procedural code. No scripts. No event handlers. It is meant for business users typically (though a savvy dev should see value in it too). Low-code is for developers, but there's less of it to write.
JourneyApps
A1: Praveen summed it up well. With no-code you can build custom software without writing a single line of code, whereas low-code platforms support the ability to write some custom code.
Praveen Seshadri
A1: @editingwhiz sometimes it is about evolution and low-code feels that way. Sometimes it is about revolution and no-code feels that way :]
Praveen Seshadri
A2: mobile apps are particularly difficult to write with traditional code. Differences between iOS and Android, device form factors, offline, etc. So both no-code and low-code are attractive approaches for mobile apps
Chris Preimesberger
It's all about evolution, isn't it? As time goes by, more and more functionality is added to platforms in order to enable better, faster app development. No- and Low-code is what this is all about for line of business users.
Appdome
That is correct.
JourneyApps
The question remains - how does this impact professional developers that are accustomed to traditional programming tools and environments?
Chris Preimesberger
This has been another excellent eWEEKchat. Great to see this monthly community-type gathering so we can learn from each other.
Praveen Seshadri
Thanks for hosting! It was fun. I suspect we'll look back on this in a few years and find that things moved much faster than we thought.
Praveen Seshadri
And thanks to the other participants. A great set of perspectives. Look forward to meeting in person at some event soon.
JourneyApps
Thanks for arranging this, Chris! Low code will power the digital transformation for many more companies, even in industries that are still hold-outs.
Jason Bloomberg
A4 @mnjhughes I'm finding a large part of developer resistance to #lowcode is that they don't like to be told what tools to use. For this audience, the challenge is making #lowcode appealing enough so they choose it on their own.
Mike Hughes
fair point - value delivered needs to be compelling for the transition to happen
mayur
agree, devs want ultimate flexibility, standardization and visibility
Praveen Seshadri
A4: if I may make a bold claim, I think no-code app platforms have to be intelligent or they are not going to be very useful. The whole point is to understand the high-level intent of the app creator and automate the code that would otherwise have to be written.
Chris Preimesberger
Can you offer a use-case example of this? Helpful to some followers.
Praveen Seshadri
A4: let's say a business user has a fleet of trucks that need to be inspected by the drivers every day. And if there's damage a report with photo needs to be sent to the manager. She wants an app for this. That's the high-level intent. It is no-code. Little else should be needed
Chris Preimesberger
So no inputting of any info at all. Correct?
Praveen Seshadri
@editingwhiz well that's the info. One way or the other, that's what the app creator inputs into a no-code system. The question I ask is --- how little translation should they need to do. Can the platform understand their intent the way they think of it?
Appdome
Agree. AI evaluates the app, recognizes the development environment used to build the app, the frameworks, and methods inside the app, the resources available to the app and more.
JourneyApps
A4: With the industry shifting away from traditional database architectures towards centralized, org-wide event streaming platforms, vendors will need to figure out how they fit into the event-streaming landscape.
Carrie Wingfield
I couldn't agree more.
Mike Hughes
A2 - but this is where some of the differences between no- and low-code creep in - with low-code you have complete control over the end-user experience and this can be important for some use cases - customer-facing apps for example
Praveen Seshadri
Agree. At the moment, consumer-facing apps need custom experiences that are difficult to standardize
JourneyApps
my rule of thumb is: if you need to leverage the mobile device's GPU (as is often the case with consumer-facing apps), low-code and no-code are probably not a good fit XD