socialauthority

Social Media Boot Camp Week 3
#B2B #SMBootCamp refresher: How to grow your online network with class
   5 years ago
#socialauthoritySocial Media Boot Camp Week 2#B2B #SMBoot Camp refresher: Your profile matters. Let's review tips, tricks and best practices.
   5 years ago
#socialauthoritySocial Media Boot Camp Week 4#B2B #SMBootCamp refresher: How to engage in #socialmedia
Denise Bahs
Q2: Should you accept any LinkedIn connection request?
Brian Gilb
A2: No, unless those people are in your industry or know them. #StrangerDanger
victoriabsocial
A2: Nope ... connect only with people who give you context and who can add value to your experience. #trust
Paul Gillin
A2 I accept connection requests from anyone who has common connections or similar interests to mine.
Mimi Murray Meagher
A2: I am strategic with my LI connections, you do not have to accept all!
CatherineCameronHeld
A2 I do not accept all requests. I look at their connections and whether they offer value to my LinkedIn communty
Paul Krappman
A2: Personal opinion - I don't accept a #linkedin invite unless I "know" the person somehow.
Paul Gillin
A2 This is a common question and everyone has his or her own preferences. Do what works for you.
Denise Bahs
A1:I tend to look to see if the person is in the same industry and then accept if so. More connections=more visibility.
Brian Gilb
A2: If you do get someone random who reaches out to you, you're more than justified to ask them why they are looking for a connection.
Jacobo Gonzalez
A2. I don't think so. Evaluate their profile, and make an informed decision. I can't tell how many people have connected with me and then tried to sell me stuff out of thin air (mostly insurances). My motto is accept potentially valuable people.
Denise Bahs
@pgillin generally I want more connections to drive people to my blog.
CatherineCameronHeld
A2 I think everyone has their own comfort level too
Denise Bahs
@JacobSoSocial it's a good lesson that no one wants to be sold to.
victoriabsocial
A2: You can use the "advice for contacting me" feature to show how open (or closed) you are to connections.
Denise Bahs
Today's first question! Q1: What are some ways to find valuable connections?
Brian Gilb
A1: best way is to listen and monitor specific topics for those who might be worth connecting with.
victoriabsocial
A1: Search on #Twitter with hashtags or use a service like @hootsuite to search for quality accounts.
Paul Krappman
A1: Check your colleagues, prospects, customers and friends past and present to find a good base of "starter followers."
Brian Gilb
A1: A good way to find valuable connections on #Twitter is to monitor #Hashtags for your industry
CatherineCameronHeld
A1 I like to see who my trusted connections are following
Denise Bahs
Go back to the goals and decide on a targeted group of people first rather than aimlessly wandering. #LinkedIn
Brian Gilb
A1: Another way to find prospects through #LinkedIn would be to monitor groups and those who are most active
Paul Krappman
A1: Then grow the base by following @GilbBrian 's advice.
Paul Gillin
Look at Twitter profiles and see who the people you're following are following
Jacobo Gonzalez
A1 - I tend to look for colleagues of my LinkedIn connections, for example.
victoriabsocial
A1: @LinkedIn is a gold mine for interesting people to connect with. Search by keyword and in groups.
CatherineCameronHeld
A1 I also look at products and appropriate hastags
Denise Bahs
@pgillin yes! piggy backing on what is already good. :)
Paul Krappman
It's important to keep in mind that no. of followers is less important than strength of affinity.
victoriabsocial
A1: Also, look at who the top Twitter accounts in the industry are following. They are often discriminating in who they follow.
Paul Gillin
A1 Go through those business cards you've been collecting!
Mimi Murray Meagher
A1: use the find connections feature in #twitter
victoriabsocial
A1: As a business, use your mail contacts and search for them on social.
Denise Bahs
Q4: Should I have separate account for business and personal?
Brian Gilb
A4: No, unless you have strong opinions about a subject, its best to keep it simple and have one account.
victoriabsocial
A4: You can, but don't have to. Many people mix personal and professional well, like @pgillin who tweets about #B2B and sports!
Paul Gillin
A4 Great question. I recommend as few Twitter accts as possible, but if your business account is transactional (like customer service), then a separate personal account is appropriate.
Brian Gilb
A4: Most #SocialMedia platforms have good filters and tools for privacy and who sees what information you post.
Paul Gillin
A4 Also, if your personal account is very specific (like @baseballnut) you might want a separate account..
CatherineCameronHeld
A4 It depends. Some people are able to combine personal and professional. Other people NEED to have separate accounts. I do.
Denise Bahs
I use mine for both, but don't really do a ton of personal tweeting.
victoriabsocial
A4: I like to keep a personal account as a playground ... almost like Pinterest where I share things that interest me.
Brian Gilb
A4: In my opinion, its easier to concentrate on building a following no one platform instead of several
Paul Krappman
Classic answer: It depends. If you are involved in completely unrelated issues/interests, separation might be a good thing.
Mimi Murray Meagher
A4: if you manage two, say personal and corporate, proceed with caution as with the Chrysler example from @pgillin
Denise Bahs
I found that people like to follow a face rather than a logo.
CatherineCameronHeld
@PaulKrappman I agree. I have a separate twitter account to support my #blog
Paul Gillin
A4 Obviously, if you tweet about controversial topics, you don't want that in your business account.
Jacobo Gonzalez
A4. I keep separated accounts. Not that I have anything to hide but living in Mexico, make it a little of a conflict of audiences, languages, but mostly messages. Follow @jcobgc :P
Denise Bahs
Q3: How do you find good LinkedIn Groups?
victoriabsocial
A3: I like to share this article from @inc http://www.inc.com/j...
Paul Krappman
A3: Search for an active group that covers the areas in which you are interested. Then jump in.
Brian Gilb
A3: Search bar...
Paul Gillin
A3 Look at profiles of your connections and see what groups they belong to.
CatherineCameronHeld
A3 Ask your customers, clients and staff what groups they find useful.
victoriabsocial
A3: Also, look at who you are connected to on LinkedIn to see if they have a Twitter handle.
Denise Bahs
Q3a: And what has surprised you about a group if any?
Mimi Murray Meagher
A3: utilize the LI search tool, look for industry specific groups and see who the top influencers are!
Paul Gillin
A3 Search for relevant groups and join the ones marked "Very Active"
Brian Gilb
A3 But on a more serious note, do a search for key words in your industry and monitor the groups for activity
Denise Bahs
A3a: Getting outside my industry realm and looking for general business groups sometimes have great conversations.
victoriabsocial
A3a - People who interact without a photo ...
CatherineCameronHeld
A3a I'm surprised how many LinkedIn groups are similar/compete with each other. Also how many are inactive.
Denise Bahs
Q3b: have you experienced anyone not kind in a group?
Paul Gillin
Paul Gillin I have a bias against open LinkedIn groups, but I was surprised to see how good the interaction is in the Social Media Marketing group bit.ly/1DSDw5G
CatherineCameronHeld
A3b No, all of my experience in LinkedIn groups have been positive