devops

Clouderati on DevOps
Thought leader conversation on DevOps and Cloud. People and tools - good patterns v. anti-patterns
   10 years ago
#devopsClouderati on DevOpsWho will beat AWS in enterprise cloud? Top thought leaders discuss the news around cloud #devops
   10 years ago
#devopsClouderati on DevOps #AWSSpecial DevOps for #AWS Re:Invent yearly cloud event. We will discuss the magic of CrowdChat on AWS
Crowd Captain
Steve Jobs said all Network Engineers need to learn how to code? thoughts on this http://www.jedelman....
Steve Jobs Thinks All Network Engineers Should Learn to Code
With some downtime this weekend, I was able to watch a few documentaries on NetFlix.  There were a few great ones on Mark Zuckerberg, Warren Buffet, Mark Cuban, and Steve Jobs.  Many of them came...
James Fryman
I think at a core level, operators who interface with computers should understand their own domain language, and a common 'glue' language. The first is to automate their own domain, and the latter is to enable usage of their domain by others.
Crowd Doc
Devops == 100% of infrastructure as code.
Andi Mann
Everyone needs to learn how to code! From my CMO needs to my 14 y.o. niece, so you bet N/W engs. need to code!
Lori MacVittie
There's a difference between coding (to develop an application) and coding (to script for automation). That distinction needs to be made, because we aren't talking about needing to be app developers, we're talking about needing basic coding / scripting.
Evan Powell
@AndiMann +1 Fundamental. It is getting easier to code. See iPhone apps. See higher level languages. Not saying easier to code *well*.... In any case this is leading to more and more coders, right?
James Fryman
@AndiMann I agree with this as well. I think in the future we'll see a different type of coder. Today, we run into challenges with domain language between experts and developers. Future devs will *be* domain experts with the ability to code.
Lori MacVittie
@epowell101 Higher level languages != easier code. IN many cases, they're more difficult because they're less rigidly defined. See Ruby as a good example.
Evan Powell
@lmacvittie Good point. Still, growth in # of devs including those wearing an ops badge seems like a driver of change?
John Furrier
Are enterprises embracing DevOps or are they just calling it something else?
Brian Gracely
depends on what you define as an Enterprise. if their "product" is digital, this is a growing segment for DevOps adoption.
Andi Mann
Both! A bunch I know are doing straight up DevOps. But many are targeting SDLC flow constraints in just 1 or 2 areas, not calling it 'DevOps'
Brian Gracely
depends on what you define as an Enterprise. if their "product" is digital, this is a growing segment for DevOps adoption.
Brian Gracely
depends on what you define as an Enterprise. if their "product" is digital, this is a growing segment for DevOps adoption.
Andi Mann
Whether that is DevOps? Does it matter? Ultimately dogma is not important, results are. Reminds me of Tom Bittman on cloud yrs ago - sometimes 80% is enough.
Evan Powell
@AndiMann Nice. Key results = speed to respond to market (internal or external demand)? Or another better more crisp KPI?
Coté
many "enterprises" @451Research talks with are in the midst of figuring out how to apply "cloud" to making their IT, and business run better, and end-up looking to #DevOps as an appdev layer on-top of that.
jaker
I don't think we can stereotype an org as 'enterprise' anymore. Look at market leaders and see what they are calling it.
ThirdWave Insights
@epowell101 Rather than speed, agility. Doing something that used to be market relevant faster is quite different than jumping into something new fast
Coté
@3rdwaveinsights well, I think in this case speed is the enabler of agility. If the appdev cycle was 6 months, less agility would likely be achieved. The ability to quickly iterate and respond to feedback (good & bad) is the benefit of speed here.
John Furrier
@AndiMann agree that dogma clouds the issue (pun intended). It's about engineering the solutions having adaptive infra
Andi Mann
@epowell101 Time to market for business ideas seems to be top driver & outcome. Cost, quality, cust. sat., revenue, penetration all critical, but speed tops the list I think.
Andi Mann
@cote Cloud is a great enabler, but less of an answer to business problems, more a starting point. DevOps, Mobile, Social, Analytics, etc. are real solutions. Cloud is the platform for them.
Andi Mann
@jakerobinson I disagree. Enterprise is not (should notbe) just a label; it indicates fundamentally different challenges - in scale, regulation, market, and more. imo
ThirdWave Insights
@cote Agree speed is an enabler... Getting feedback could also be viewed as an enabler... these all contribute to make the business more agile.
jaker
@AndiMann but saying 'what do enterprises call it' eludes that all enterprises move at the same speed and have the same culture. Just because an org is of a certain size does not mean they get there a certain way.
jaker
@AndiMann but saying 'what do enterprises call it' eludes that all enterprises move at the same speed and have the same culture. Just because an org is of a certain size does not mean they get there a certain way.
jaker
@AndiMann but saying 'what do enterprises call it' eludes that all enterprises move at the same speed and have the same culture. Just because an org is of a certain size does not mean they get there a certain way.
Lori MacVittie
@AndiMann Excellent point, Andi. Enterprises have different challenges and thus different reasons for adopting DevOps, but they're just as valid - whatever they might call it.
Evan Powell
Maybe we s/d jump into - patterns. Some excellent operators on this chat. What's the most surprising people pattern you've seen? What's the most surprising technical pattern you've seen?
Coté
in enterprise-y settings, there's a counter-intuitive audit-enabler. If so much is automated, proving you have a repeatable process is easier than when your process is more manual. Cf.: http://devopscafe.or...
Coté
in enterprise-y settings, there's a counter-intuitive audit-enabler. If so much is automated, proving you have a repeatable process is easier than when your process is more manual. Cf.: http://devopscafe.or...
Carmine Rimi
This shouldn't be a surprise, but the psychology of change comes to the fore when introducing DevOps technical patterns into an existing org.
Evan Powell
One big surprise for me: we see developers of operations environments in their own silo *a lot*. Are others seeing silos built w/ the goal of eliminating the dev vs. ops silos?
John Furrier
culture pattern is one of engineering focus vs developer or ops hiring. New tech and sw needs to be engineered and that is DevOps main value; culture issue is one of misunderstanding of what DevOps really is to IT or bus owners
Carmine Rimi
I do see the silo pattern a lot. Sometimes it is a skills mismatch that engenders the silo
James Fryman
I see a lot of Infra silos, and the justification often is that developers don't understand ops challenges. This is just another form the wall between dev/ops takes. Both teams need to be able to see/do the others job for real change to happen
John Furrier
Pattern I'm seeing is the use of Node and converged infra (compute going to the data)
Evan Powell
@jfryman See the other's job seems possibly more achievable than "do" the other's job. Is this where collaboration comes in do you think? Transparent ops => ChatOps ?
James Fryman
ChatOps is absolutely the 'do' part. It is unrealistic to expect IT Professionals to understand 100% of all domains. ChatOps allows domain experts to distill key features/components of a company into digestible chunks anyone can use/repeat.
Evan Powell
@jfryman @cote - Cote, cannot remember if we've chatted re: ChatOps. James is both hands on and extremely thoughtful re: topic. Opened my eyes one Nashville morning...
Evan Powell
Why the heck is DevOps happening? What's the single top driver? (marketing? :)
John Furrier
software for a new generation is my angle on this - infrastructure as code; programmable infra
Carmine Rimi
I think Automation is a big driver
Coté
what we see is companies wanting to deploy software more frequently, filling your App Store with new updates.
Carmine Rimi
I think it it is automating the last mile
Evan Powell
GitHub might not exist w/o it, right @jfryman? Fixing software dev and ops creates new business - software eating the world level of productivity boost.
Coté
indeed, as @carminerimi says, much of DevOps is enabled by automating "everything" in the appdev cycle. Otherwise, it'd just be SlowOps.
James Fryman
I think that DevOps methodologies have been a major in making GitHub more efficient. Enabling Developers to be more agile in launching new features fast == more opportunities to test/launch/maintain revenue streams
John Furrier
@cote SlowOps is good; at vmworld they talked about automation but not much about orchestration
jaker
Organizations are incorporating technology into everything they do. Whoever can adapt to the needs of the customer most efficiently wins the market.
Matthew Selheimer
DevOps is happening because business now operates in an on-demand world; DevOps is the best method IT has to respond to this need
Matthew Selheimer
DevOps is happening because business now operates in an on-demand world; DevOps is the best method IT has to respond to this need
François Villain
I think it started mainly because the cloud apis made it possible in the first place. Starting a trend that now touches all IT perimeter. it's like a global awareness raise of (new) possibilities